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Media Arts: Audio Recording Instructor Anthony Beardslee

Media Arts: Audio Recording Instructor Anthony Beardslee

Josh Crim, Writer

Who better to teach audio recording at Northeast than someone who graduated from that program? A graduate who has 25 years experience in live sound, possesses...  Read More »

Dec 15 • No Comments

Recent Campus Stories

  • Media Arts: Broadcasting Instructor Brian Anderson December 15, 2016
  • Norfolk World War II veteran recounts service December 9, 2016
  • Media Arts: Audio and Digital Cinema Instructor Timothy Miller December 8, 2016
  • Spring Housing Availability 2017 December 6, 2016
  • Make moola at schoola December 6, 2016
  • Students get creative with pottery November 29, 2016
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Hawks rout Hastings College, 117-56; Tuesday’s game rescheduled

Hawks rout Hastings College, 117-56; Tuesday’s game rescheduled

NORFOLK - The Northeast Community College women's basketball team downed Hastings College JV here tonight, defeating the Broncos 117-56. Northeast (17-1) had a fast start,...  Read More »

Jan 17 • No Comments

Northeast men’s basketball downs Southeast, 112-84

January 10, 2017

Hawks women’s basketball defeats Southeast, 89-63

January 10, 2017

Northeast women’s basketball routs Iowa Central, 74-33

December 19, 2016

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Crime House

Crime House

Hawk TV had a chance to take a look around the lab house for Criminal Justice, Marissa Lute tells us more. ...  Read More »

Nov 1 • No Comments

Hawk TV News 10-25-16

Hawk TV News 10-25-16

October 25, 2016

Hawk TV News 10-11-16

Hawk TV News 10-11-16

October 11, 2016

Audio Recording Students help with The Back Forty Concert

Audio Recording Students help with The Back Forty Concert

September 16, 2016

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Norfolk Area Schools listed for Recognition Honoring Veterans

Norfolk Area Schools listed for Recognition Honoring Veterans

  LINCOLN – More than 220 individual schools and school districts from across the state, including schools in Madison County: Battle Creek Public Schools, Newman...  Read More »

Jan 10 • No Comments

Madison County Fair Summer Entertainment

Madison County Fair Summer Entertainment

January 10, 2017

Give Back this Holiday Season

Give Back this Holiday Season

December 5, 2016

Freedom Soars

Freedom Soars

December 5, 2016

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Northeast Community College offers educational overseas opportunities

Northeast Community College offers educational overseas opportunities

Marissa Lute, Editor-in-Chief

Northeast Community College prides itself with great education, excellent value, and the friendly and caring staff that work on the campus. Along with the low tuition and...  Read More »

Nov 10 • No Comments

ARTRAGEOUS

ARTRAGEOUS

October 25, 2016

Northeast Drama Club’s in the Spotlight

Northeast Drama Club’s in the Spotlight

October 14, 2016

Phi Beta Lambda has Nebraska Football Raffle

Phi Beta Lambda has Nebraska Football Raffle

October 13, 2016

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On Netflix

Love Alarm Set to Become Netflix First Korean Original Series

Seoul - January 5, 2017 - Netflix Inc., the world’s leading Internet television network, today announced its first Korean original series Love Alarm, based on the webto...  Read More »

Jan 18 • No Comments

Veronica Castro, Aislinn Derbez and Cecilia Suarez will take part in a Netflix Original Series

The upcoming project, created by Manolo Caro, will begin filming in Mexico in 2017 Beverly Hills, California, January 11, 2017- Netflix, announced today that Veronica Castro (The rich also cry) is not only making a comeback, but o...  Read More »

Jan 17 • No Comments

Netflix Unveils Its Most Epic Kids Show Yet… Just When Families Need It Most

Beverly Hills, CA, December 14, 2016 - ‘Twas the day after Christmas and all through the house, no child was complaining, not even a spouse. The gifts were unwrapped...  Read More »

Jan 5 • No Comments

Movies

Will How Paramount’s ‘Monster Trucks’ went awry

Will How Paramount’s ‘Monster Trucks’ went awry

By Ryan Faughnder Los Angeles Times (TNS) Paramount Pictures originally conceived its new movie “Monster Trucks” as fuel for its upstart animation business. But instead, the long-delayed big-budget picture is poised to become the first major box-office wreck of 2017. The live action-computer animation hybrid, about a teenage boy who befriends a tentacled, gas-guzzling monster in his truck, is on track to gross $8 million to $10 million during its first four days in theaters this weekend — an abysmal result for a movie that cost $125 million to make. Troubling signs have been apparent for months. The first trailer for “Monster Trucks” released in June became the butt of widespread Internet snark, and reviews from professional critics have been mostly negative. In an unusual preemptive move, Paramount’s parent company, Viacom Inc., in September disclosed it would take a $115 million write-down “related to the expected performance of an unreleased film,” quickly revealed to be “Monster Trucks.” Studios rarely announce such write-downs before movies are actually released. “You knew right after seeing the first trailer that it was going to bomb,” Jeff Bock, a box-office analyst for Exhibitor Relations, said of “Monster Trucks.” “I’m surprised ‘Mystery Science Theater 3000’ doesn’t already have the rights to this.” The troubled “Monster Trucks” is just the latest headache for Paramount, the storied Hollywood studio that is trying to recover from a string of box-office flops and a wave of corporate upheaval. Hoped-for blockbusters including “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” and “Star Trek” sequels underperformed last year amid a bitter power struggle between controlling shareholder Sumner Redstone and former Chief Executive Philippe Dauman, who was ousted in August. The long journey of “Monster Trucks” began in 2013, when Paramount’s president at the time, Adam Goodman, conceived the idea for the film after observing how much his 3-year-old son enjoyed playing with toy trucks and cars. The studio, led by Chairman and Chief Executive Brad Grey and then-Vice Chairman Rob Moore approved, hoping it could turn the concept into a “Transformers”-like franchise with toy sales and sequels. The movie became a passion project for Goodman, whom the studio had tasked with building Paramount Animation. Paramount tapped “The SpongeBob Movie: Sponge Out of Water” producer Mary Parent to produce the picture and hired director Chris Wedge, best known for Fox’s 2002 blockbuster “Ice Age.” The film was first scheduled for release in summer 2015, but the studio later moved its target to Christmas. Then Paramount fired Goodman, the movie’s chief advocate, in February 2015 because of the studio’s thin film release slate. Without Goodman, “Monster Trucks” became an orphan at the company, according to people familiar with the matter who were not authorized to speak publicly. The studio pushed back the film’s release two more times as executives turned their attention to other pictures. A recent presentation by Grey to show off upcoming movies didn’t mention “Monster Trucks,” instead focusing on prestigious films such as “Arrival” and Martin Scorsese’s “Silence.” But marketing would have been a challenge for “Monster Trucks” even without the bad buzz surrounding the Viacom write-down. The film was originally meant to attract a wide audience but turned out to be more kid-oriented than expected, insiders said. Another problem was that “Monster Trucks” was an original idea that lacked the branding clout of movies based on Nickelodeon and Hasbro properties. Instead of creating mystery around the monster, the trailers tended to emphasize the movie’s goofier aspects, including a scene where the octopus creature belches. “A 6-year-old boy might like it, but I doubt parents will,” said Bock, the Exhibitor Relations analyst. Then there is the fact that “Monster Trucks” is labeled as a Paramount Animation film, even though it’s not a traditional animated picture. The studio decided a live-action production with a major computer-generated imagery element would work better for the story and lead to a faster turnaround, according to people close to the project. Hybrid movies like Sony Animation’s “The Smurfs” and Fox’s “Alvin and the Chipmunks” have worked well, but those movies had familiar characters. Paramount executives declined to comment on the film. “Monster Trucks” was once a top priority as part of the studio’s push into computer animation. Paramount launched its animation unit in 2011 after the critical and commercial success of the CGI Johnny Depp comedy “Rango,” which won an Oscar for best animated feature. Then Paramount lost its key supplier of family franchises, Jeffrey Katzenberg’s DreamWorks Animation, in 2012. That increased pressure on Paramount to come up with a pipeline of animated pictures, which have become an increasingly important global business for the major movie studios. Three of the 10 highest-grossing films last year were animated. Those titles, “Finding Dory,” “The Secret Life of Pets” and “Zootopia,” grossed nearly $3 billion combined worldwide. The feature animation business is more competitive than ever, with Universal Pictures growing its “Minions” production company Illumination Entertainment and acquiring DreamWorks Animation last year. Warner Bros., 20th Century Fox and Sony Pictures have all planted flags in animation. Paramount has entered the animation business in fits and starts. Its 2015 film “Sponge Out of Water” was a winner, grossing more than $320 million worldwide. But the animation unit’s leader, Bob Bacon, abruptly exited the studio that summer. Then, Paramount unexpectedly abandoned its planned release of “The Little Prince,” an independently produced adaptation of the beloved French book that has received strong reviews. Netflix bought the rights and released it last summer. Paramount Animation doesn’t have another release planned until 2018. Paramount Motion Picture Group President Marc Evans would not comment specifically on “Monster Trucks,” but he said he is “confident” in other upcoming titles, such as “Amusement Park” and “Sherlock Gnomes.” Future releases, he said, will be mostly conventional animated movies, as opposed to live-action films with a CGI component. The unit has a small staff of about 10 people and mainly relies on other companies to do the computer animation. “More than any part of our business, animation takes time,” Evans said. “We have learned a lot to date. We are excited and confident in what we have in our pipeline and committed to building Paramount Animation for the long-term.” Hollywood executives and analysts said it’s too early to say whether Paramount Animation will be successful, given the time and money it takes to produce computer animated features. Computer animated movies take about four years to make and cost at least $75 million each before marketing is factored in. Big movies from Disney and Pixar often cost more than $150 million. “It’s a little tough, because they don’t have a stable of famous characters,” said Tom Sito, chair of animation at USC. “They’ve had to establish a new brand, and that’s a tall order on a short production schedule.” Still, Paramount’s Evans said he is upbeat about future animated releases. “Amusement Park,” expected to debut in 2019, is now in production, featuring voice acting by Matthew Broderick and Jennifer Garner. “Sherlock Gnomes,” a co-production with MGM, is due out in January 2018. The studio also has high hopes for a “SpongeBob” sequel, set to hit theaters in early 2019. To boost its slate, Paramount in May signed a deal to develop and produce animated movies with Elisabeth Murdoch’s Locksmith Animation, based in Britain. The companies said they will develop three properties and plan to release the first in 2020. “We are building our animation division organically,” Evans said. ——— ©2017 Los Angeles Times Visit the Los Angeles Times at www.latimes.com Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Jan 17 • No Comments

Recent Movies Stories

An encore for ‘Allegiance’: George Takei’s Broadway musical about internment will return to film theaters

An encore for ‘Allegiance’: George Takei’s Broadway musical about internment will return to film theaters

January 17, 2017

By Deborah Vankin Los Angeles Times (TNS) If you missed George Takei’s Broadway musical, “Allegiance” — or the subsequent one-night-only screening of the live production in movie theaters nationwide — then fear not. It’s coming back by popular demand. The Dec. 13 movie-theater presentation of “George Takei’s Allegiance: The Broadway Musical on the Big Screen” set a record for the company that presented it, Fathom Events. The premiere was its highest-grossing one-night Broadway musical event, the 14-year-old company said, bringing in more than $1 million in ticket sales in about 600 theaters. “George Takei’s Allegiance” will return to select theaters for a one-day encore Feb. 19. “Allegiance,” which was Takei’s Broadway debut, is about the internment of Japanese Americans after the attack on Pearl Harbor. It was loosely inspired by the actor’s own childhood, and Takei played a World War II veteran looking back on his youth. The production debuted in 2012 at the Old Globe in San Diego; it opened on Broadway in November 2015 and closed the following February. Part of the Fathom success was no doubt because of Takei’s popularity. The original Mr. Sulu of “Star Trek,” now 79 and an outspoken political activist, has become a social media star with more than 10 million Facebook “likes” and about 1.9 million Twitter followers. But the musical’s subject also gives “Allegiance” a relevance that may resonate broadly, Takei said. “At a time when echoes of the interment ring once again far too loud in our political discourse, there’s never been a better moment for the story of ‘Allegiance’ to find new audiences,” Takei said in a statement. “It is a true testament to the power and the relevance of this story that so many people attended its premiere in December, and it is only appropriate that even more people will be able to witness it on such an important day as Feb. 19, 2017.” The screening is scheduled on what’s being called the Day of Remembrance, the 75th anniversary of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066, which initiated the forced relocation and internment of an estimated 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry, most of whom were American citizens. “The Day of Remembrance is a day of commemoration, of reflection and of learning,” Takei said, “and I hope ‘Allegiance’ can play an important role in its celebration, this year, and for many years to come.” ——— ©2017 Los Angeles Times Visit the Los Angeles Times at www.latimes.com Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

He’s in tune with the Day of the Dead: Director Lee Unkrich wanted an authentic take on the celebration

He’s in tune with the Day of the Dead: Director Lee Unkrich wanted an authentic take on the celebration

January 17, 2017

By Kevin Crust Los Angeles Times (TNS) Since we were formally introduced to Pixar via a hopping desk lamp and a rubber ball in the animated short “Luxo Jr.” three decades ago, the studio has brought to life toys, insects, monsters, fish, cars, rodents, robots and increasingly, as the technology caught up, humans. In “Coco,” directed by Lee Unkrich and opening Nov. 22, Pixar will focus its talents toward something else entirely: skeletons. The film takes place in Mexico and tracks the journey of a fully fleshed 12-year-old named Miguel, consumed with his familia’s generations-long ban on music. This is particularly vexing to the boy since his dream is to be become a great musician like the late Ernesto de la Cruz. Miguel hails from a village named for Santa Cecilia, the patron saint of musicians, and modeled by Pixar on towns in the Mexican state of Oaxaca. A mystical, magical chain of events leads Miguel to the skeleton-populated Land of the Dead, and accompanied by a streetwise vagabond named Hector, he tests his musical prowess and unravels a family mystery he never knew existed. Unkrich has long been fascinated by the celebration of Dia de los Muertos, or the Day of the Dead, especially the iconography and folk art surrounding the event, when the living and the dead are briefly reunited. “It seemed like a really beautiful celebration,” said the director, who comes to “Coco” with “Monsters, Inc.,” “Finding Nemo” and “Toy Story 3” under his belt. “This idea of actively and joyously remembering your loved ones who are no longer with you seemed like a great place to tell a real emotional family story and also have a lot of fun.” Five years ago, Unkrich began planning his film but “Coco’s” path to fruition was not without bumps. In 2013, the Walt Disney Co., Pixar’s parent, withdrew an application to trademark “Dia de los Muertos” after a public uproar over its cultural insensitivity. “It was a mistake that happened, and we regretted it immediately,” said Unkrich. From the beginning, Unkrich sought to involve members of the Latino community in the process “so that at every turn we could have as much authenticity and as specific a voice as possible. Hopefully, it will never be tone deaf or lapse into cliche. Based on the reactions from the consultants who we’ve shown the film to already, we feel confident that we’re doing a great job and doing right by the culture.” The quest of authenticity extended to the characters and casting. Ernesto de la Cruz, voiced by Benjamin Bratt, is a composite of beloved Mexican musicians such as Pedro Infante, Jorge Negrete and Vicente Fernandez. Character actress Renee Victor (“Weeds”) voices another key character, Miguel’s abuelita, the Coco of the film’s title. “One of the joys of working on the film has been Gael Garcia Bernal,” said Unkrich. The “Mozart in the Jungle” star plays Hector, Miguel’s trickster sidekick. “He’s just an amazing guy, and he’s brought so much charm and fun.” According to Unkrich, “finding a good kid actor is like finding a needle in a massive haystack.” For the crucial part of Miguel, the film’s star, the director cast 11-year-old Anthony Gonzalez, who lives in Los Angeles and has since turned 12. “It’s been a race against time to get this done before his voice changes,” said the director. “He’s really great, and I’m lucky to have found him. He makes the movie super-special.” Though it’s not strictly speaking a musical, there are a lot of songs in “Coco,” as virtually all of the characters are performers. The soundtrack will be a mix of original music and Mexican standards. “When people think of Mexican music, they most often think of mariachi, and that of course is one part,” said Unkrich. “But there’s really a vast landscape of music, and we’ve tried to embrace all of it.” Unkrich brushed off concerns of similarities to Jorge Gutierrez’s 2014 “Book of Life,” an animated musical fantasy produced by Guillermo del Toro, which was also set in Mexico around the Day of the Dead. “We’re telling a very different story than he was,” said the filmmaker. “Obviously, it’s still set against the holiday so there are a few common elements here and there, but the two stories are completely different. You can have more than one Christmas story.” ——— ©2017 Los Angeles Times Visit the Los Angeles Times at www.latimes.com Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

The 10 films we’ve gotta see

The 10 films we’ve gotta see

January 17, 2017

By Los Angeles Times Film Staff Los Angeles Times (TNS) From the first flurries of franchises in January through the last gasp at Oscar-qualifying runs in December, there will be, conservatively, around 300 films released in 2017. For the purposes of this preview, The Times’ film writers and reporters chose to write about the movies they were most excited to see in the year to come. So in chronological order … “John Wick: Chapter Two” Feb. 10 Director: Chad Stahelski Cast: Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Ruby Rose No one expected much from the first “John Wick.” Looking at the cast list and synopsis, it looked as if it could’ve been the kind of action-thriller that airs Sunday night at 11 on some basic-cable network: Keanu Reeves plays the shadowy title figure, who kicks off a revenge spree after Russian thugs kill his dog. And, yes, that is pretty much what “John Wick” is. It is also the kind of grindhouse, exploitation fun that Hollywood doesn’t make any more, executed with style and verve by directors Stahelski and David Leitch — themselves stuntmen, fight choreographers and second-unit directors making the leap to the big chair. “John Wick” made $86 million worldwide off an estimated $20 million budget. With that kind of math, you get a sequel. This time around, it doesn’t seem that a puppy needs to die to prompt Wick — again played by Reeves like a world-weary Neo, able to work ballistic miracles with a gun in his hand — to commit mayhem. And anyone who grew up on the action cinema of the ‘80s and ‘90s is already in line for popcorn. —Marc Bernardin ——— “Get Out” Feb. 24 Director: Jordan Peele Cast: Daniel Kaluuya, Allison Williams, Catherine Keener, Bradley Whitford, Keith Stanfield Comedy star Peele (“Key and Peele,” “Keanu”) makes the leap to horror — and goes behind the camera — with this Blumhouse thriller with a frighteningly resonant premise: Chris (Kaluuya), an African American man, and his white girlfriend Rose (Williams) pay a weekend visit to her family in the suburbs, where he discovers insidious shenanigans targeting the black residents of her very idyllic, very Caucasian hometown. Peele (who also wrote the script) updates the simmering suburban paranoia of “The Stepford Wives” into a 21st century nightmare in which micro-aggressions are murder on more than just your nerves — and all too familiar in today’s still-divided America. Keener and Whitford costar as the parents whose discomfort over their daughter’s new romance might just belie something more sinister, while up-and-comer Stanfield (“Straight Outta Compton”) pops up as a fellow visitor with a smile on his face and panic in his eyes. Peele’s genre debut comes loaded with social commentary and opens during Black History Month — and judging from the reaction to its sharply entertaining first trailer, could spark a new subgenre of close-to-home horror thrusting interracial and class tensions into the pop culture conversation. —Jen Yamato ——— “Beauty and the Beast” March 14 Director: Bill Condon. Cast: Emma Watson, Ewan McGregor, Dan Stevens, Ian McKellen, Luke Evans, Josh Gad Let’s be real, a live-action “Beauty and the Beast” with full-on musical soliloquies is a bold idea. But the thought of Watson as Belle running up a hill belting out, “I want adventure in the great wild somewhere,” hits right in that sweet nostalgia spot, hard. There is absolutely no way a live-action film about singing household objects and a young woman falling in love with what appears to be a furry minotaur, and yet we’re curious. Deadly curious. The chances of finding one member of this office sitting front row full-on cry-singing through “Bonjour” one minute and then uncomfortably squinting at Stevens’ interpretation of the Beast is high. Why? Because the cast reads like it came straight out of the Internet’s dream journal. Watson and Stevens play the leads while McGregor was cast as the candlestick Lumiere, McKellen is the clock Cogsworth and Emma Thompson is the teakettle Mrs. Potts. Early standouts Evans as the egomaniacal villain Gaston and his lackey Le Fou played by Gad are already creating plenty of buzz when the two started singing from their Instagram accounts. It feels like Disney has been ramping up to this feature film for years, first with the song-free live adaptation of “Cinderella” in 2015 followed by Jon Favreau’s “Jungle Book,” which trotted out a few familiar tunes from the animated classic. But this “Beauty and the Beast” adaptation feels less like another artist’s interpretation but an homage to the past. —Meredith Woerner ——— “The Fate of the Furious” April 14 Director: F. Gary Gray. Cast: Vin Diesel, Michelle Rodriguez, Dwayne Johnson, Charlize Theron, Tyrese Gibson, Chris Bridges, Helen Mirren The last 16 years have been one epic globe-trotting roller coaster for Dominic Toretto (Diesel) and his motley gang of streetwise racers-turned-international operatives. Such is life when you live a quarter-mile at a time. But after emotionally eulogizing their beloved late co-star Paul Walker in 2015’s seventh “Fast and Furious” installment, the high-octane saga of this multicultural new-millennium familia drifts into soapy high-action drama with a shocking twist: Just as the crew is settling into new normal lives, along vrooms a villainous Theron to seduce Dom away from his honeymoon and over to the dark side. Shaking up Hollywood’s most adaptable and cannily evolving action franchise by pitting Diesel against his brawny brethren, led by Johnson, director Gray (“Straight Outta Compton”) takes the helm and adds Theron, Mirren and Scott Eastwood. Will Dom’s crew ride or will they die to bring their brooding leader back while battling an anarchist bent on igniting global chaos? How many Coronas will be spilled as unexpected betrayals and alliances rock Universal’s hit franchise? —J.Y. ——— “Alien: Covenant” May 19 Director: Ridley Scott. Cast: Michael Fassbender, Katherine Waterston, Billy Crudup, Danny McBride It hasn’t always been easy being a fan of the “Alien” franchise. Launched in 1979 with Scott’s masterpiece, the series has soldiered on for four decades through various follow-ups and Predator-battling spinoffs that have occasionally hit the mark (James Cameron’s “Aliens” comes to mind) but often proved disappointing. The most recent installment, 2012’s prequel “Prometheus,” grossed more than $400 million worldwide, but critics and audiences were divided on the film, with some finding it ponderous. (In space no one can hear you scream, but on the Internet everyone can hear your bellyaching.) Now, to the delight of longtime fans, Scott appears to be bringing the series back to its horrifying roots. In “Alien: Covenant,” the crew of a colony ship, en route to a distant planet, finds what they at first think is an undiscovered paradise, only to realize that it is inhabited — surprise! — by the titular monstrous xenomorphs. At 79, Scott still makes movies with the hard-charging intensity of someone a third his age, and the idea of him going back to the spine-chilling core of one of his greatest films — well, it’s enough to make your heart nearly burst out of your chest. —Josh Rottenberg ——— “Wonder Woman” June 2 Director: Patty Jenkins. Cast: Gal Gadot, Chris Pine, Robin Wright In the oversaturated market of bros in capes, it’s high time a woman punched her mighty fist through the countless waves of male-centric superhero movies. All the world’s waiting for the “Wonder Woman” movie not only because this will be the first female-led superhero movie since 1984’s “Supergirl” but also because the character Diana Prince (a.k.a. Wonder Woman, played here by Gadot) is fire. The daughter of a god, Wonder Woman is a warrior who carries her sword in the back of a ballgown and deflects bullets with her bracelets. More importantly, she considers it her sacred duty to defend the world. She’s driven by love and justice, so while Batman is sulking in his cave, Diana is out in the trenches getting things done. In the film, Diana will leave her idyllic homeland (populated by fierce actresses like Wright and Connie Nielsen) to help the Allies in World War I. The icing on the cake? The film is directed by Jenkins from the 2003 gut-kick of a film “Monster.” It’s a collection of great talent both in front of and behind the camera, so fingers crossed for “Wonder Woman,” because it’s about damn time. —M.W. ——— “Spider-Man: Homecoming” July 7 Director: Jon Watts. Cast: Tom Holland, Zendaya, Michael Keaton, Marisa Tomei, Donald Glover, Robert Downey Jr. There are lots of reasons fans were thrilled by 2016’s “Captain America: Civil War,” but high on that list was “Holy crap, is that Spider-Man?! And he’s a teenager?! And he sounds like he’s from Queens?!” With that extended cameo, Marvel head honcho Kevin Fiege erased the Andrew Garfield-led “Spider-Man” movies from memory and set the table for a new version of the old webslinger, one who had goofy-boy-genius bursting from his red-and-blue seams. “Homecoming” finds Peter Parker in high school navigating the whims and whimsies of an adolescent life — bullies, homework, girls, supervillains — while dealing with the extracurricular responsibilities that come with being “Avengers”-adjacent. A Spider-Man film that aims to mate teen angst with John Hughes-ian bounce? Yeah, that’ll play. —M.B. ——— “Dunkirk” July 21 Director: Christopher Nolan. Cast: Tom Hardy, Mark Rylance, Kenneth Branagh, Cillian Murphy, Harry Styles First off, it’s the source of our favorite stupid movie rumor of all time, which had Nolan spending $5 million of Warner Bros.’ money to buy a vintage Nazi war plane, outfit it with an Imax camera and then spectacularly crash it for a scene in this upcoming World War II epic. It’s crazy, right? Nolan would never destroy … an Imax camera. History buffs can also rest easy as Warner Bros. assures us that no priceless airplanes were harmed during the making of this film — though many were in fact used to tell the true story of the massive, miraculous evacuation of Allied soldiers from the beaches of Dunkirk, France, in the early days of the war. It’s Nolan’s first foray into history and, as you’d expect from the guy who made “Interstellar,” “Inception” and “The Dark Knight” trilogy, it’s going to be ambitious, extravagant and, yes, set to a bombastic, eardrum-rattling score by composer Hans Zimmer. There are no half-measures with Nolan, which, given the subject matter, will be entirely appropriate this time around. The 1940 Dunkirk rescue turned what Winston Churchill called a “colossal military disaster” into a “miracle of deliverance.” Shooting with both Imax and 65mm film cameras, expect Nolan’s “Dunkirk” to capture every inch of the rescue’s horror and triumph. —Glenn Whipp ——— “The Dark Tower” July 28 Director: Nikolaj Arcel. Cast: Idris Elba, Matthew McConaughey, Tom Taylor Stephen King fans have a big summer ahead. Elba stars as Roland Deschain, a lone gunslinger-knight on a quest to save his world by reaching the titular spire that stands at the nexus of time and space. McConaughey goes evil as the Man in Black, a power-hungry sorcerer with his own nefarious designs on harnessing the tower’s potential. Hollywood has been attempting to adapt King’s ambitious eight-novel lit series for a decade now; over the years the bestselling science-fiction horror-western property has been developed by the likes of J.J. Abrams and Ron Howard. This summer we’ll see if Sony Pictures and MRC have done the near impossible with Danish director Nikolaj Arcel (the Oscar-nominated “A Royal Affair”) at the helm: Adapting King’s celebrated genre-blending magnum opus into a feature film that not only brings the books to life but also whets appetites for a planned 2018 TV spinoff series set to explore the saga’s backstory. —J.Y. ——— “Blade Runner 2049” Oct. 6 Director: Denis Villeneuve. Cast: Ryan Gosling, Harrison Ford, Ana de Armas, Robin Wright and Jared Leto Initially met with mixed reviews, Ridley Scott’s 1982 “Blade Runner,” adapted from Philip K. Dick’s 1968 novel “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?” has gone on to become a stone-cold sci-fi classic. A visually stunning, emotionally haunting rendering of an all-too-plausible dystopian future, the neo-noir tale of a cop (Ford) who hunts down renegade androids has cast a vast influence over the pop culture landscape, from movies like “The Fifth Element” and “The Matrix” to TV series like “Battlestar Galactica” and “Westworld.” While the idea of a follow-up has been kicking around for nearly 20 years, many doubted the magic of the original could ever be recaptured, assuming any attempt at a sequel would be just a pale replica (or replicant) of the original. But as the pieces have come together — with Ford stepping back into his iconic role as Rick Deckard and Villeneuve, who directed the moody, cerebral sci-fi hit “Arrival,” at the helm — anticipation has steadily mounted. Set three decades after the events of original film, “Blade Runner 2049” centers on a young LAPD blade runner (Gosling) who uncovers a secret that leads him on a quest to find Deckard, who has been missing for 30 years. If you consider yourself a sci-fi fan and that doesn’t get you excited, you should probably submit yourself to a Voight-Kampff test to make sure you’re really human. —J.R. ——— ©2017 Los Angeles Times Visit the Los Angeles Times at www.latimes.com Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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New biography explores the real-life Victorian horror behind Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’

New biography explores the real-life Victorian horror behind Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’

By Mary Ann Gwinn The Seattle Times (TNS) “Something in the Blood: The Untold Story of Bram Stoker, The Man Who Wrote “Dracula’” by David J. Skal; Liveright (652...  Read More »

Oct 31 • No Comments

2016 Notable Books List: Year’s best in fiction, nonfiction and poetry named by RUSA readers’ advisory experts

2016 Notable Books List: Year’s best in fiction, nonfiction and poetry named by RUSA readers’ advisory experts

January 22, 2016

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Entertainment

He’s in tune with the Day of the Dead: Director Lee Unkrich wanted an authentic take on the celebration

He’s in tune with the Day of the Dead: Director Lee Unkrich wanted an authentic take on the celebration

By Kevin Crust Los Angeles Times (TNS) Since we were formally introduced to Pixar via a hopping desk lamp and a rubber ball in the animated short “Luxo Jr.” three decades ago, the studio has brought to ...  Read More »

Jan 17 • No Comments

Netflix Unveils Its Most Epic Kids Show Yet… Just When Families Need It Most

January 5, 2017

The world’s leading Internet TV network is the new home of India’s biggest film star.

January 3, 2017

Netflix Announced Medici: Masters of Florence’ for US, UK, Canada and India

December 10, 2016

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The official student newspaper of Northeast Community College.
The official student newspaper of Northeast Community College.