African American Students Discuss Black History Month

Lilly Ryken

With it being Black History Month, some people may be wondering, why is it so important for people to know Black History? Knowing Black History creates a sense of unity. America is a predominantly white institution, making African Americans a part of the minority. A group of African American students at NECC gather to talk about Black History Month. 

Kee Clinton said, “In terms of progression I think African Americans have really taken a step forward with recognition. I think after more videos were leaked, and the truth came out, it opened more people’s eyes.”

 When Clinton talked about videos being leaked, one of the videos he was referring to was about the killing of George Floyd. George Floyd was an African American man who was killed during an arrest after a store clerk alleged he passed a counterfeit $20 bill. A police officer who arrived at the scene knelt of Floyd’s neck for 8 minutes and 46 second, leaving him lifeless. This happened less than a year ago, on May 25th, 2020. This event was filmed and taken by the media. Killings with racist motives happen all the time, this time it was filmed for everyone to see.

“Something we need to work on as a country is standing up for one another, controlling ourselves, and making the right decisions,” Yeisha Williams explained “I think we’re slowly losing our rights once again.”

Aviana Azure followed Williams and said, “I don’t think there has been much progress honestly. A big step is getting people to acknowledge what’s going on instead of denying it.”

While living in a predominantly white community it can be hard to feel accepted as an African American. Lately there has been a lot of tension on social media when race is involved. Michael Anderson said, “People, to this day, still believe we aren’t capable of being doctors or lawyers. Speaking of which, hospitals deny plenty of different black men and women essentially because they are black.”

“Yes, Black people can be successful, but success shouldn’t just be in athletics and entertainment, these are the standards that we are held to.” Kee Clinton said, “I don’t want you to praise me because I am Black. I just want to be considered equal. Nothing more, nothing less.”

 

 

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